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Bronco/ Ace of Sunlight

  
Bronco/ Ace of Sunlight

Jess Roden ( formerly of the Alan Bown Set during the late sixties) rose to moderate fame for a short while in the mid seventies as The Jess Roden Band, after his Butts Band adventure with 2 remaining Doors. He was last seen, at the turn of the century, in a band called Jess Roden and the Humans.
Few people realize that he also sang and played in a hippy country/folk/rock band in the early seventies, in the UK. This band was called Bronco. They made 3 albums, but Jess Roden left the band after the second one, the fine “Ace of Sunlight” LP, which IMHO is a true folkrock classic. 

The first album, titled “Country Home”, sounds somewhat rough and premature – although I like it a lot too- while the third one is inconsistent, it is clear that the band was losing ground and going nowhere by that time.

Just recently, in February, a friendly guy uploaded some Ace of Sunlight tracks to YouTube. I really thank him for doing that, because these songs were rapidly sinking into oblivion. 

There has been a excellent cd reissue of the 2 Island Lp’s and it is still being sold by Amazon. Probably the songs will show up in Spotify or Apple Music too but I’ve got no subscription, so I can’t check.

I still own the 2 vinyl Island albums, even the 3rd album on Polydor, called “Smokin’Mixture”. (See photo)

I saw this comment in Wiki:
During the winter of 2009, deep archive research began into a full-scale Anthology – designed to encompass Roden’s entire musical career. During this process, well over 800 pieces of music were logged (and in the vast majority of instances, digitised for the first time) from which a career defining Anthology has been compiled. The set Hidden Masters: The Jess Roden Anthology – which includes over 50% of previously unheard material – was issued as a limited edition, 1st pressing of 950 copies, 6-CD set by Hidden Masters in 2013.
Anyway, here’s one haunting track from the beautiful Ace of Sunlight LP. It’s called Sudden Street.
Some tracks in YouTube are incomplete. Pity.


Review of “Country Home”:

Bronco “Country Home”

#ajournalofuneventfuldays #jessroden #bronco

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Is this where you live? #10

  
Is this where you live? #10

The plot of land was left a few years ago. These people were forced to leave because building here was deemed illegal. Nature returns to the scene, slowly.
#ajournalofuneventfuldays #isthiswhereyoulive

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Everyman/Elckerlic

   
 
Elckerlic/Everyman
“Elckerlic is a morality play in Dutch literature of the Middle Ages. We do not know who the author was.

It was first found in print in 1496 and to this day it remains unclear which of both came first: the Dutch “Elckerlic” or the English “Everyman”
One fragment in the Dutch version goes like this:
Och, doot, sidi mi soe bi,

als icker alder minst op moede!

Doot, wildi van mi hebben goede?

Duysent pont sal ic u gheven,

Op dat ic behouden mach mijn leven.

Ende doet een verdrach van desen
In modern English it roughly sounds like this:
Oh, death, you are so close to me,

when I was not in the least expecting you!

Death, shall I offer you things of value?

I will give you a thousand pounds,

if you will leave me and will let me live.

And please, can we agree on this?
Everyman, is also a novel by Philip Roth, published in May 2006. It won the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction in 2007. It is Roth’s third novel to receive the prize.

It is loosely based upon the old “Elckerlic”/”Everyman”, the stories from the Middle Ages by anonymous writers.
Everyman is the title of the fifteenth-century English morality play whose eponymous protagonist is “called” by death and must account for his life on earth before God. About the play, Roth said the following in a late 2005 interview:

The moral was always “Work hard and get into heaven”, “Be a good Christian or go to hell”. Everyman is the main character and he gets a visit from Death. He thinks it’s some sort of messenger, but Death says, “I am Death” and Everyman’s answer is the first great line in English drama: “Oh, Death, thou comest when I had thee least in mind. (When I thought of you least.)
Photos: covers of early Elckerlic and Everyman editions.

#ajournalofuneventfuldays #everyman #elckerlic

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Atomium

Atomium
Yesterday I visited the Atomium in Brussels, somehow the shallow equivalent of the Eiffel Tower in Paris or London’s Big Ben.

It was built for the 1958 World Exhibition which was supposed to herald a new age of endless peace, great (scientific) progress & unlimited prosperity resulting thereoff.

And what’s more, it would finally enable us to forget all about World War II, and all wars, for once and for all.

Meanwhile though, the cold war was gathering momentum, the revolt in Hungary was beaten down by the Soviets in 1956, France had started its war on terror in Algeria, the Cuba crisis and the Vietnam war were in the making. Kennedy was going to be shot five years from then…

Anyway, there really was a USSR pavilion. And a pavilion of the so-called “Arabic States” too. (photos are on display inside of the Atomium).

One more thing: Belgium was about to lose its “Belgian Congo” the source of its very private colonial wealth deep down there in Africa. Which, by the way, had made… the 1958 exhibition possible.

#ajournalofuneventfuldays #atomium

 

  
    
 

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Random landscapes #16

  
Random landscapes #16
Not much can be said about random landscapes. 

They are there, just for one second or for awhile. 

When you turn your back to iwhat you see, you forget all about it at once, even if it’s the thrusted vieuw of the street where you live. You forget the details in the photo too, although everything which is there, is completely unique: these things will never come back in exactly the way they are when you made the photo. 

IMHO this is somewhat different from the photos you make in say Fukushima or Tsjernobyl; their uniqueness makes them stick in your mind”s eye for a long time. Still, even in the no-go zones time is changing slowly but steadily. Each second is special.

One millisecond ago the Oval Office and the Kremlin were totally different places.

#ajournalofuneventfuldays #randomlandscapes

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Pearls Before Swine/ Another Time

Pearls Before Swine/ Another Time
Tom Rapp wrote this wonderful song in 1967 for his band Pearls Before Swine and it was the opener on their first album called “One Nation Underground”. Both this record and the equally great follow-up “Balaklava” were on on the legendary Esp Disk-label.

By the way, imo Balaklava is among the best folkrock albums ever made.

Bass is quiet and solemn, deep down in the mix, you need good speakers to appreciate it, which is important because it’s essential to the “nature” of this song.

  

 

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André Breton/ les vases communicants

André Breton/ les vases communicants
(…)

Le 5 avril 1931, vers midi, dans un café de la place Blanche où mes amis et moi avons coutume de nous réunir, je venais conter à Paul Éluard mon rêve de la nuit (le rêve du haschisch) et nous finissions, lui m’aidant, car il n’avait vu vivre le plus grand nombre des heures du jour précédent, de l’interpréter, lorsque mon regard rencontra celui d’une jeune femme, ou d’une jeune fille, assise en compagnie d’un homme, à quelques pas de nous. Comme elle ne paraissait pas autrement gênée de l’attention que je lui marquais, je la dédaillai, de la tête au pieds, très complaisamment, ou peut-être est-ce que d’emblée je ne parvins plus à détacher d’elle mon regard. Elle me souriait maintenant, sans baisser les yeux, ne semblant pas craindre que son compagnon lui en fit grief. Celui-ci, très immobile, très silencieux et dans sa pensée visiblement très éloigné d’elle – il pouvait avoir une quarantaine d’années – me faisait l’impression d’un homme éteint, plus que découragé, vraiment émouvant d’ailleurs.

(…)
(Gallimard, 1970, first published 1933)
In this book André Breton tries to point out that the real world and the world of dreams are but one. He takes a close look at several theories which offer an interpretation of dream worlds. While building his theory , he thoroughly investigates Freud’s views on dreams.

Ultimately, for Breton the unity of reality and dreamworlds originates from a profound social transformation. Beyond many revolutionary events, he seems to be looking for ” the eternal destination of mankind”.

#ajournalofuneventfuldays #andre breton 

 

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